Why 2019 Could be a Record-Setting Year for Flooding

“66% of the contiguous U.S. is prone to experience overland flooding”

Why 2019 could be a record-setting year for flooding

When it comes to flooding, there’s no off-season. Floods can strike at any time, almost anywhere, and only increase in threat with the onset of hurricane season. This may explain why every state in the continental U.S. has experienced some form of flooding over the past 10 years, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Spring is traditionally the period when flooding is particularly common, and it appears as though that may be especially true this year, and perhaps even into the better part of summer, based on analysis from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA).

In its spring outlook report, the NOAA stated at least 66% of the contiguous U.S. is prone to experience overland flood risk for the entirety of May. Already, several parts of the country are in states of emergency, particularly the Midwest.

Exceptionally rainy this spring

The rationale for the NOAA’s assessment is a combination of factors. Most notably, the U.S. has received copious rainfall. The Boston area serves as a classic example. Of the 30 days in the month of April, Massachusetts’ capital city experienced rain for 22 of them.

That’s been the story for most of the nation, only conditions have been far worse in low-lying and flat portions of the country. Melting snow and spring thaw created a perfect storm of moisture-rich conditions.

Neil Jacobs, acting administrator at NOAA, said preparation is paramount for homeowners and business owners, as well as city and town planners.

“In addition to the safety aspects, our rivers are critical to the economic vitality of the nation, supporting commerce, recreation and transportation,” Jacobs advised. “NOAA forecasts and outlooks help people navigate extreme seasonal weather and water events to keep the country safe and moving forward.”

Evacuations ongoing in parts of Gulf Coast

Swollen rivers are proving problematic in the nation’s midsection. Evacuations were recently ordered for those living in proximity to the Mississippi River due to levee breaches, according to multiple sources. The Mississippi and Red River received record amounts of wet conditions, causing them to rise 200% higher than what is typical for this time of year, NOAA reported.

It very well may be a record-setting year for flood frequency, warned Ed Clark, director of the National Water Center at NOAA.

Flooding is the No. 1 natural disaster in America and it’s important that you treat it as such. It’s also highly correlated with hurricane development, a season that is just around the corner and warrants strategic preparation. Here at BMS CAT, we specialize in water damage restoration and flood recovery, by offering 24-hour emergency response services. Over the years, we have helped thousands of clients recover from disasters – both big and small. By providing services to mitigate fire, water and storm damage, we help reestablish businesses and restore communities. Contact us today to learn more about our services.